Idaho

After our tour of the State House, there was time for questions.  One of the first things I learned was the building is heated by underground hot springs which come from deep in the earth. Idaho is an interesting state with lots of mountains and rivers. We found out that if all the mountains were flattened out, Idaho could be the size of Texas.  Idaho is famous for its potatoes, it grows about 20 percent of the nation’s crop, and about 50 percent of McDonald’s french-fries come from Idaho potatoes.

Everyone wanted to know what the word Idaho means.  It is actually a made up word! People in Colorado tried the name out first for their territory, but didn’t like it.  Then it was used by miners looking for gold in the territory and it stuck.  Idaho became a territory in 1863 when Abraham Lincoln signed the bill, then a it became a state in 1890. In 27 years the Idaho Territory had 16 governors, four who never set foot in Idaho!  Maybe that was why so many silly laws were passed, because no one was there to say no to the voters.   Purrs, Gulliver

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Italy

I love visiting Italy. Pasta, pizza, pianos and violins were all created by Italians, and the first operas (stories set to music) were written in Italy. The name Italy comes from the word italia, meaning “calf land,” perhaps because the bull was a symbol of the Southern Italian tribes.  Italy is slightly larger than Arizona. It is shaped like a high heel boot kicking a rock or piece of dirt. Nearly 80% of Italy is either mountainous or hilly.   There are many famous explores who were Italian, including Christopher Columbus, Marco Polo, John Cabot, and Amerigo Vespucci – his name was adapted to America.  Maybe someday I will discover a new land and have it named Gully!       Purrs, Gulliver

Italy

Big Scissors, Little Cat

Gulliver is eagerly awaiting International Post Day, October 9, 2013.  He has been trying his paw at making his own postcard, cutting card stock in halves and quarters and gluing old map sections to the card stock.  To celebrate this day, the classrooms who have been receiving cards will be making their own postcards describing their community and what they like to do. Those cards are then put in a large envelope and mailed to another classroom.  The classrooms will receive an envelope in return, though not necessarily the same number of cards sent, depending on class sizes. At this time, there are no international classrooms set up to swap with. Maybe next year.

The cards may vary from hand drawn to photographs to stickers, map sections and collages of pictures from local magazines.   The most important part is not the picture, but what is written by the student. This is an exercise in creative thinking, evaluating his/her surroundings and communicating in complete sentences.  Cats are always aware of their surroundings, now it is time to take a page from their “book of life” and stretch your horizons.

As a side note, here is an excellent short history on the origin of the postcard:     gulliver with scissorshttp://www.co.seneca.ny.us/history/Postcards%20History.pdf

 

Purrs,

Gulliver